Founded in 1998, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition (LACBC) works to build a better, more bike-able Los Angeles County. LACBC is the only membership-based nonprofit organization working exclusively for the millions of people who ride bikes in Los Angeles County. Through advocacy, education and outreach, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition brings together the diverse bicycling community in a united mission to make the entire L.A. region a safe and enjoyable place to ride.

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September 16, 2014 News 0 Comments

We're proud to announce that the upcoming season of Operation Firefly is sponsored by the Laemmle Charitable Foundation. The foundation benefits nonprofits agencies working to improve life in Los Angeles through addressing social and environmental issues critical to the region. 

Operation Firefly (Operacíon Luciérnaga) is an education and bike light distribution program intended to make sure people riding bikes in Los Angeles are riding safely at night.

Join the Laemmle Charitable Foundation in Sponsoring Operation Firefly

Join the Laemmle Charitable Foundation in helping to make this next season of Operation Firefly bigger and better, so we can reach even more night-time bicycle riders.

We also have some fun levels at which you can join Team Firefly and receive a premium. (Lights, hats, and vests will ship beginning the first week of November 2014.)

You can also make a general donation to the Operation Firefly program. Did you know that donating $10 means that 1 more person will soon be riding around at night with lights? Donate $50 and 5 more people will be a little safer. $100 and that number jumps to 10.
 
Learn more and make your donation at: la-bike.org/OperationFirefly

September 16, 2014 Event 0 Comments

Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 5:30pm - 10:30pm

The L.A. County Bicycle Coalition (LACBC) and the Hollywood Bowl invite you to gear up for "Bike to the Bowl" on September 28th.

PIXIES · GOGOL BORDELLO · CAT POWER - Sunday, September 28, 7 p.m., bike valet opens at 5:30 p.m.

Free Bike Valet

Keep your bike safe during the show with LACBC's free Bike Valet in the Museum Patio on Peppertree Lane at the Hollywood Bowl. The valet will be open from 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. for both concerts.

Free Ice Cream

Enjoy a free scoop of ice cream from Peddler's Creamery! Just show your bike valet ticket or Metro tap TAP card at the Hollywood Bowl Museum Patio.

Metro/Ride

For those of you looking for a completely #CarFree concert experience, #TAPandSave with a hybrid ride. Use the Metro Bike Map to find routes near stations and Rapid bus stops. Plan your best route using the Trip Planner.

Hollywood Bowl Bike Map

September 11, 2014 Event 0 Comments

Wednesday, September 3, 2014 - 4:00pm - 9:00pm

Update: September 18, 2014: Earlier today, LACBC filed a public records request with the District Attorney's office to determine whether Lacey has ever pressed charges for vehicular manslaughter in any case, not just Olin's. When people walking and bicycling (and driving) are killed almost every day in Los Angeles County due to distracted, aggressive, or negligent driving, all relevant agencies must do their part to reduce traffic violence. We continue to invite Lacey to host a town hall with us to hear from victims of traffic violence and discuss ways that her office can partner with law enforcement and the community to end this epidemic.

Update September 11, 2014: Yesterday afternoon, LACBC received a response from District Attorney Jackie Lacey to our September 3rd letter requesting reconsideration of criminal charges against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputy who hit and killed prominent entertainment attorney Milt Olin while he was riding in a bike lane during broad daylight on December 8th, 2013. This case has drawn widespread media attention due to Olin’s high profile and the involvement of a sheriff’s deputy.

The District Attorney’s office is maintaining its position that there is not enough evidence to convict Deputy Andrew Wood of vehicular manslaughter, despite the fact that he was texting in the minutes leading up to the collision and, while typing into his mobile digital computer (MDC), left his lane, entered the bike lane, and struck Olin from behind. As outlined in our letter, vehicular manslaughter charges require evidence of negligent driving, defined as driving in an illegal manner, or in an otherwise legal manner which might produce death. That Wood failed to maintain control of his vehicle while distracted, engaged in a task that he knew to be “inherently unsafe” according to department training, and killed a man as a consequence of his actions, is evidently not enough for Lacey to press charges.

LACBC believes that Lacey is wrong in her analysis of this case, and that her failure to prosecute puts the lives of everyone who travels Los Angeles County’s streets at risk. In her response, she fails to distinguish between intent (no one is accusing Wood of intending to kill Olin) and negligence. In fact, her response fails to set any kind of minimum duty of care for drivers to not engage in behavior that is likely to kill.

Every traffic death is both tragic and unnecessary. When someone is killed or seriously injured on our streets, every contributory factor deserves consideration so that future deaths can be prevented: the design of the street, mechanical failure, and, most importantly, the behavior of all involved. When people walking and bicycling (and driving) are killed almost every day in Los Angeles County due to distracted, aggressive, or negligent driving, all relevant agencies must do their part to reduce traffic violence. The District Attorney is responsible for prosecuting individuals for behaviors that put our communities at risk, and using the threat of prosecution as a deterrent to others who might engage in the same behaviors. Our culture has decided to tolerate traffic violence. That acceptance of near-daily death, as if it were an inevitable cost of mobility, leads to insensitivity or outright hostility toward those most at risk--so-called “vulnerable road users”--including people walking and bicycling. In Milt Olin’s case, we are now witnessing a failure of our criminal justice system to protect victims of violence.

We cannot accept that traffic violence is OK and we cannot stay silent when our criminal justice system fails to protect victims. If the District Attorney won’t prosecute a case as clear-cut as Olin’s death, every potential victim of traffic violence is less safe. What happens when the facts of the case aren’t as clear? When a mom is hit crossing the street with her kids in Hollywood? Or a youth riding on the sidewalk in South L.A.?

We invite Lacey to host a town hall with us to hear from victims of traffic violence and discuss ways that her office can partner with law enforcement and the community to end this epidemic.

Please make sure your voice is heard. Please write to District Attorney Lacey to let her know that our lives matter.

 

September 4, 2014: Last week we learned that the L.A. County District Attorney's Office would not be pressing charges against the sheriff's deputy who struck and killed Milt Olin in Calabasas last December. The sheriff's deputy was typing on his mobile computer in his patrol car when he struck Olin at 48 miles per hour. Olin, a prominent entertainment attorney and former executive for Napster, was pronounced dead at the scene. 

Last night, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition, Yield to Life, and the Ghost Bike Foundation hosted a ride and vigil for Milt Olin to call on the D.A. to revisit the investigation and consider pressing charges. Thank you to the 120 people who came out. Some met us at the start in Calabasas, some at the L.A. Zoo, some in Grand Park by the Criminal Courts Building, a few at other points along the route--but it was all for the same purpose: to demand justice for Milt and to make our streets safer for all road users.

Many local media outlets (CBS, NBC, ABC, Los Angeles Times, Daily News, Los Angeles Register, Thousand Oaks Acorn, Streetsblog Los Angeles) covered the ride and interviewed the attendees about why they came. Several had stories of motorists hitting them while biking and being moved to participate in the ride and vigil to convey that this is enough. You can see photos from the ride and vigil on our Facebook page and read Tweets with the hashtag #RideForMilt.

Attendees also signed a banner addressed to District Attorney Lacey, urging her to revisit the case and adding personal stories of why this case matters. After submitting our letter to the District Attorney yesterday, we aim to get this banner to her. We also encourage you all to contact the District Attorney's Office as well.


Contact the District Attorney's Office

Here are ways to contact the County of Los Angeles District Attorney's Office:

1. E-Mail: webmail@da.lacounty.gov, bcc: info@la-bike.org

2. Snail mail to:

District Attorney's Office
County of Los Angeles
210 West Temple Street, Suite 18000
Los Angeles, CA 90012-3210

3. Phone: (213) 974-3512

4. Twitter: @LADAoffice

Sample Letter:

Subject: Please File Charges; DA Case #34210485

Dear District Attorney Lacey,

Those of us that bike and walk on streets in Los Angeles County are at tremendous risk of becoming victims of traffic violence. In fact, nearly 40% of those killed on LA County streets are bicyclists and pedestrians, triple the national average. This is a problem with many causes, but not least is the role of negligent, distracted and aggressive driving. Milt Olin’s death hits very close to home for me. He was doing absolutely everything right: riding correctly in a bike lane in broad daylight. In contrast, the person who killed him was doing everything wrong: typing on a computer, texting his wife, speeding, and ultimately veering into the bike lane and hitting Milt from behind. As a result, Milt is no longer alive, leaving a grieving wife and two sons who will likely never feel comfortable riding a bike on the road ever again.

As a community, it is critical that we work in a coordinated effort to reduce traffic violence. It is one of the leading causes of death for all age groups and communities across the county. We all must do our part to behave responsibly while driving or riding, and support infrastructure changes to our streets to make them safer for all. Your decision not to prosecute Milt’s killer undermines all of our hard work to make our streets safe and humane. As a result, we can no longer feel safe to move about our communities--no different than if you had chosen not to prosecute any other violent criminal.

It is not too late to correct this injustice. Please reconsider your decision and file charges in this case so that those of us that bike and walk can again feel that we are protected by the justice system.

Sincerely,

Your Name
Your Address

 

September 2, 2014 Event 0 Comments

Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Join LACBC, L.A. Walks, Safe Routes to School National Partnership in CaliforniaStreetsblog L.A., and The Hub LA for this reception to welcome new L.A. Department of Transportation (LADOT) General Manager Seleta Reynolds.

Last month, Seleta Reynolds took over as the general manager of LADOT. Formerly of the Livable Streets sub-division of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA), Reynolds brings years of experience working on active transportation projects. Join us as we welcome her to Los Angeles and learn more about her vision for transportation here.

Food and refreshments will be provided by Angel City Brewery, Big Man Bakes, and Pitfire Pizza.

When: Tuesday, September 23; 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Where: The Hub L.A. - 830 Traction Ave., 3rd floor, Los Angeles, 90013 (in the Arts District, see map)

RSVP: RSVP required here.

Have a question you'd like to ask Seleta Reynolds? Email us at eric@la-bike.org, or post it on our Facebook event page, and we may use your question.

August 27, 2014 News 0 Comments

The Three Feet for Safety Act went into effect on September 16, 2014. The law requires motorists to give at least three feet of clearance when passing a bicyclist traveling in the same direction. The previous law required motorists to pass bicyclists while keeping a “safe distance." The new law defines “safe distance” as three feet. If not enough space is available, the motorist must slow down and pass when no danger is present to the bicyclist.

One key to making the new law effective is to make sure the driving public knows about it. LACBC has collaborated with AAA, Wire Media, and CalBike to create an “I Give 3 Feet” graphic for use to publicize the new law. This graphic can be downloaded from Wire Media here. We encourage all media outlets (big or small), bicycle groups, and interested parties to download and utilize this graphic, along with the associated bullet points about the law.

YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THE "I GIVE 3FT" GRAPHIC FROM WIRE MEDIA HERE.

Key points to include with the Three Feet for Safety Act graphic are:

  • The previous law required motorists to pass bicyclists while keeping a “safe distance."
  • This new law defines “safe distance” as three feet when passing bicyclists traveling in the same direction.
  • If not enough space is available, the motorist must slow down and pass when no danger is present to the bicyclist.
  • Violators will face a $35 fine, as well as a $220 fine if a collision occurs.
  • Law took effect September 16, 2014.

AAA has printed 10,000 window clings for public distribution utilizing the same graphic, and their roadside assistance will be handing out tip cards with the graphic starting in September. Our partners at CalBike are also offering two sticker designs to help promote the new law. You can request the window clings and the CalBike stickers directly from CalBike by following this link: https://calbike.org/bulkgiveme3form

Our work with AAA and CalBike is made possible thanks to the support of LACBC members and donors. Not a member? Become an LACBC member or make a donation today.

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